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How To Cast To Tailing Redfish

HOW TO CAST TO TAILING REDFISH

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HOW TO CAST TO TAILING REDFISH

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Solo Sight Fishing For Tailing Redfish

IT AIN’T EASY, BUT NO ONE SAID IT’D BE EASY.

It sure beats fishing with someone who doesn’t know how to shut their trap when stalking spooky fish. With the right tools and conditions, fishing solo for tailing redfish can be quite fruitful. In fact, it is one of my favorite types of fishing. It’s just you and the fish.

Whether the tide is coming in or going out doesn’t make much difference to the fish. I’ve found that it’s all about depth. Find the right depth with some decent water movement, and you will find the fish. When I do fish with my buddies, I often times tell them “we’re about to find fish.” Inevitably they’ll ask how do you know? And almost without failure I’ll respond, “tail at 2 O’clock.” It’s all about the depth. Once I find the right depth, I know the tailing fish aren’t far behind.

When fishing a new area, I like to survey flats at their lowest point usually at the bottom of the tide. It allows me to see what parts of the flat the fish will likely use to traverse the flats, and where they will stage on different parts of the tides. As the tide comes in, I’ll watch and see which areas the fish use and compare it to the areas I thought they’d use to work their way onto the flat. This becomes extremely useful when targeting tailing redfish. If you find the fish use a certain part of the flat to enter the flat, then it is likely they’ll also use the exact same area to exit the flat.

Once I’ve found good fish, I find it important to have the right gear to get the job done. An Osprey 2500 or 3000 spooled with 8-10 lbs braid (I went with a little overkill and used a 4000 w/ 20 lbs braid in the video) paired with a 7’6” Bull Bay Rods – Stealth Sniper is a perfect set up for solo sight-fishing for tailing redfish. You’ll want the ability to cast as far as possible since you will often find yourself drifting away from the fish either due to the wind or tides if you are on any type of shallow drafting vessel. If you’re wade fishing, you’ll benefit just as much from having the ability to make long casts. There’s nothing worse than watching a fish tail ferociously just out of casting range.

A Camo Slayer Inc. SST on a 4/0 1/16th or 1/8th Oz keeper hook is typically my bait of choice for cruising fish (tail walking fish as anglers often call them) or for lower light conditions. The vibration of the large paddle tail helps alert the fish. If a fish is head deep in the grass, very close to me, or I need to be a little more accurate with my casts, I find a Golden Bream DOA Shrimp rigged on a 3/0 1/16th Oz keeper hook to be a little more effective. Remember that the fish eat from their head and not their tail, so it is important to anticipate where the fish’s head will be in the water in order to increase hook ups.

I hope this article is helpful for those interested in fishing for tailing redfish. It’s an extremely rewarding and very addicting type of fishing, but it definitely takes some time to learn how to do it effectively on a regular basis. Stay tuned for more in depth content on sight fishing for tailing redfish.

Good Fishing!

-Ty Nelson

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IT AIN’T EASY, BUT NO ONE SAID IT’D BE EASY.

It sure beats fishing with someone who doesn’t know how to shut their trap when stalking spooky fish. With the right tools and conditions, fishing solo for tailing redfish can be quite fruitful. In fact, it is one of my favorite types of fishing. It’s just you and the fish.

Whether the tide is coming in or going out doesn’t make much difference to the fish. I’ve found that it’s all about depth. Find the right depth with some decent water movement, and you will find the fish. When I do fish with my buddies, I often times tell them “we’re about to find fish.” Inevitably they’ll ask how do you know? And almost without failure I’ll respond, “tail at 2 O’clock.” It’s all about the depth. Once I find the right depth, I know the tailing fish aren’t far behind.

When fishing a new area, I like to survey flats at their lowest point usually at the bottom of the tide. It allows me to see what parts of the flat the fish will likely use to traverse the flats, and where they will stage on different parts of the tides. As the tide comes in, I’ll watch and see which areas the fish use and compare it to the areas I thought they’d use to work their way onto the flat. This becomes extremely useful when targeting tailing redfish. If you find the fish use a certain part of the flat to enter the flat, then it is likely they’ll also use the exact same area to exit the flat.

Once I’ve found good fish, I find it important to have the right gear to get the job done. An Osprey 2500 or 3000 spooled with 8-10 lbs braid (I went with a little overkill and used a 4000 w/ 20 lbs braid in the video) paired with a 7’6” Bull Bay Rods – Stealth Sniper is a perfect set up for solo sight-fishing for tailing redfish. You’ll want the ability to cast as far as possible since you will often find yourself drifting away from the fish either due to the wind or tides if you are on any type of shallow drafting vessel. If you’re wade fishing, you’ll benefit just as much from having the ability to make long casts. There’s nothing worse than watching a fish tail ferociously just out of casting range.

A Camo Slayer Inc. SST on a 4/0 1/16th or 1/8th Oz keeper hook is typically my bait of choice for cruising fish (tail walking fish as anglers often call them) or for lower light conditions. The vibration of the large paddle tail helps alert the fish. If a fish is head deep in the grass, very close to me, or I need to be a little more accurate with my casts, I find a Golden Bream DOA Shrimp rigged on a 3/0 1/16th Oz keeper hook to be a little more effective. Remember that the fish eat from their head and not their tail, so it is important to anticipate where the fish’s head will be in the water in order to increase hook ups.

I hope this article is helpful for those interested in fishing for tailing redfish. It’s an extremely rewarding and very addicting type of fishing, but it definitely takes some time to learn how to do it effectively on a regular basis. Stay tuned for more in depth content on sight fishing for tailing redfish.

Good Fishing!

-Ty Nelson

Read more


Chevy Florida Insider Fishing Report Features Osprey Spinning Reel

This week on the Chevy Florida Insider Fishing Report, Capt. Ricky Murphy and Capt. Dave Ferrell briefly review the Osprey Spinning Reel on the CFIFR New Product Showcase!

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This week on the Chevy Florida Insider Fishing Report, Capt. Ricky Murphy and Capt. Dave Ferrell briefly review the Osprey Spinning Reel on the CFIFR New Product Showcase!

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A Bright Future For Tampa Bay

FISHING MAN. I JUST LOVE FISHING.

But let me tell you, Tampa Bay fishing can be…well you know or have probably heard. There are more guides than there are weekend warriors and there are a lot of weekend warriors; crossing the Bay becomes a nightmare as quick as the flick of a switch; and in order to catch good fish it seems you must have the good bait, a blacked out well of white bait that is. With that being said, Tampa Bay has proven to be a very productive fishery when fished right.

The other week, FFP Co-Founder, Tim Sommer, and I were able to get out on the Bay with my good friend, Connor Jones. Connor is a senior at UCF studying Business Management, but in his spare time he kayak fishes the state primarily targeting Redfish, Snook, and Trout. On this particular day, we were fortunate enough to get out on his 17’ Key West to do a little live bait fishing here in the live bait capital of the world, Tampa, Florida.

Late spring is typically a good time of year for finding good white bait, and it didn’t take us long to black out the well. Gotta love being able to catch bait within a mile of the ramp. Something us Caloosa Hatchee boys no longer have the freedom of doing due to a variety of reasons (LAKE OKEECHOBEE DISCHARGES), but that’s a story for another day. Connor had been on a good Snook bite, and was pretty confident the tides and weather would work in our favor.

First spot, first chummers to hit the water, and the Snook were POPPIN’ all around the boat. To our surprise, a kayaker jumped a spunky 20 lbs tarpon nearby and then the bite absolutely went off. Every cast we were hooked into a mid-twenty inch Snook, which are a blast to catch on the Osprey 3000s.

After about an hour of catching mid-sized fish, the bigger fish began to chew. We lost a couple of what looked to be slot fish due to pulled hooks, and then the man in the gray suit ruined our party. We hit a couple of other spots, put a few more solid Snook in the boat and then called it an early morning.

Although the fishing in Tampa Bay can be tough at times, it was encouraging to see the seemingly endless amount of bait, the big numbers of small and mid-sized Snook, and also the overall amount wild life thriving on these waters. As always, it was a blessing just to get out on the water and certainly a treat that we were able to hook, jump, and land a lot of fun sized fish. Until next time…

-Ty Nelson

 

Gear Used:

7’6” Bull Bay Stealth Sniper

7’8” Bull Bay Stealth Sniper

Osprey 2500 Spinning Reel

Osprey 3000 Spinning Reel

Osprey 4000 Spinning Reel

Owner 1/0 Circle Hooks

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FISHING MAN. I JUST LOVE FISHING.

But let me tell you, Tampa Bay fishing can be…well you know or have probably heard. There are more guides than there are weekend warriors and there are a lot of weekend warriors; crossing the Bay becomes a nightmare as quick as the flick of a switch; and in order to catch good fish it seems you must have the good bait, a blacked out well of white bait that is. With that being said, Tampa Bay has proven to be a very productive fishery when fished right.

The other week, FFP Co-Founder, Tim Sommer, and I were able to get out on the Bay with my good friend, Connor Jones. Connor is a senior at UCF studying Business Management, but in his spare time he kayak fishes the state primarily targeting Redfish, Snook, and Trout. On this particular day, we were fortunate enough to get out on his 17’ Key West to do a little live bait fishing here in the live bait capital of the world, Tampa, Florida.

Late spring is typically a good time of year for finding good white bait, and it didn’t take us long to black out the well. Gotta love being able to catch bait within a mile of the ramp. Something us Caloosa Hatchee boys no longer have the freedom of doing due to a variety of reasons (LAKE OKEECHOBEE DISCHARGES), but that’s a story for another day. Connor had been on a good Snook bite, and was pretty confident the tides and weather would work in our favor.

First spot, first chummers to hit the water, and the Snook were POPPIN’ all around the boat. To our surprise, a kayaker jumped a spunky 20 lbs tarpon nearby and then the bite absolutely went off. Every cast we were hooked into a mid-twenty inch Snook, which are a blast to catch on the Osprey 3000s.

After about an hour of catching mid-sized fish, the bigger fish began to chew. We lost a couple of what looked to be slot fish due to pulled hooks, and then the man in the gray suit ruined our party. We hit a couple of other spots, put a few more solid Snook in the boat and then called it an early morning.

Although the fishing in Tampa Bay can be tough at times, it was encouraging to see the seemingly endless amount of bait, the big numbers of small and mid-sized Snook, and also the overall amount wild life thriving on these waters. As always, it was a blessing just to get out on the water and certainly a treat that we were able to hook, jump, and land a lot of fun sized fish. Until next time…

-Ty Nelson

 

Gear Used:

7’6” Bull Bay Stealth Sniper

7’8” Bull Bay Stealth Sniper

Osprey 2500 Spinning Reel

Osprey 3000 Spinning Reel

Osprey 4000 Spinning Reel

Owner 1/0 Circle Hooks

Read more


The Road Less Traveled Day 2

There has always been a special place in my heart for the Lagoon. I remember driving through the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge for the first time. It was more like driving into Jurassic Park.

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There has always been a special place in my heart for the Lagoon. I remember driving through the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge for the first time. It was more like driving into Jurassic Park.

Read more